NORTHERN CALIFORNIA GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY

  

 

The NCGS Masters and PhD Scholarships – Renamed!

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The NCGS Richard Chambers Memorial Scholarships

 

The NCGS is very pleased to announce the strengthening and renaming of our Masters and PhD Scholarship Awards.  Recently the NCGS received a substantial bequest from the Estate of former NCGS member Richard Chambers (substantial at least for the NCGS).  The will stipulated that the funds were to be used for future NCGS scholarships.  As a result the NCGS Board, at the Spring Board meeting, voted to rename the existing Masters and PhD scholarship program The NCGS Richard Chambers Memorial Scholarships and to increase the award amounts to the extent possible.  To that end the Masters Scholarship was raised to $1,000, and the PhD Scholarship was raised to $2,000 for the 2007 – 2008 year at a Board Meeting.  The name of the existing NCGS scholarship awards for a Bachelors degree will remain unchanged and will be funded with funds directly generated by NCGS members (dues, donations, etc.).

 

As a young man, Dick Chambers served a tour in the Navy on an aircraft carrier, became an avid fan of aviation, and in later years was often seen helping out at events at Buchanan Field in Concord.  Dick was an accountant for the Production Department in Chevron and spent most of his career in the Central Valley of California and Alaska. He was interested in geology and was a member of the NCGS.  Demonstrating this interest, the Geology Department at Oregon State University and the California State Mining and Minerals Museum also received bequests.  After retirement from Chevron he was active in Mount Diablo Interpretive Association as a docent and was very active in the Concord Historical Society.  He had not married, and at his passing was living in Pittsburg, California.

 

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2008 - 2009

 

Four 2008 - 2009

NCGS Undergraduate Scholarship Awards

$500

 

The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce the award of four 2008-2009 NCGS Undergraduate Scholarships of $500 each.  The awardees are Chad Carlson (California State University, Fresno), Lisa Jacob (University of California, Davis), Luke Martin (Southern Oregon University), and Daniel McCuan (California State University, Bakersfield).
 

The following are significantly shortened synopses from the submittals; blame only the editor for incompleteness.

 

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Chad Carlson, California State University, Fresno; Re-dating of andesitic and basaltic flows in and around the confluences of the North, Middle and South Forks of the San Joaquin River, California; Advisor Dr. John Wakabayashi.

Chad Carlson’s Senior Thesis intends to re-date up to a dozen separate volcanic units in the San Joaquin River drainage, above the present forks of the San Joaquin.  Previous research has used some of the volcanic flows to provide minimum ages of Late Cenozoic uplift and incision.  Some of these units may have flowed into the paleostream at the time of formation.  Gravels that may be at the base of some of the units can provide spatial information of the vertical separation between past stream beds, and ultimately a stream incision rate may be resolved.  Because rates of incision will change over time as base levels change, comparing the dated units can identify increases and decreases through time, and can help to determine the time frames for significant uplift and tilt to the central portion of the Sierra Nevada Batholith.

The original Potassium / Argon dates (3.6 – 3.4 mya) are decades in print (Dalrymple, 1964), and are suspect of errors based on the re-dating of similar volcanics (Lovejoy) by Argon / Argon.  Later K/Ar dating by Bailey (1987) have provided some dates slightly younger than 3.0 mya.  Mr. Carlson will be using whole rock Ar / Ar analysis.  The results will help refine the understanding of the timing and amount of Late Cenozoic uplift in the central Sierras.  Coupled with continuing research in the Northern, Central, and Southern Sierras, the hope is to build a complete understanding of Sierra Nevadian evolution.

 

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Lisa Jacob, University of California, Davis; Salinity Changes in an Estuary-Using the Geochemisty of Benthic Foraminiferal Shells to Develop a Ba/Ca Relationship for Tomales Bay, CA; Advisor Dr. Ann D. Russell.

The goal of this research is to test the use of geochemical signatures (Ba/Ca, δ18O, and δ 13C) in benthic foraminiferal shells and water samples as proxies of salinity, and develop calibration curves necessary to create a paleosalinity profile of Tomales Bay.  This approach has been successful in reconstruction salinity in other estuaries; however, Ba/Ca relations must be determined for each estuary.  If the Tomales Bay samples support this approach, paleorecords of salinity in the bay can be created from down-core profiles of Ba/Ca and δ 13C in future research.  A paleosalinity profile will allow for the development of a record of freshwater input into Tomales Bay.  The importance of a long-term paleosalinity record is to provide context for the alteration in timing and intensity of freshwater input as predicted by climate change models for Northern California.  The study of estuarine salinity is particularly significant due to its sensitivity to climate change.

 

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Luke Martin, Southern Oregon University; Determining Provenance of Rock Fragments Within Conglomerates of the Payne Cliffs Formation (Eocene), Southwestern Oregon and Northern California;  Advisor Dr. Bill Elliott.

The Payne Cliffs Formation that interests Luke Martin and his advisor consist of a 160 m thick basal conglomerate overlain by over 2,150 m of sandstone with conglomeratic lenses.  Located in the Klamath Mountains, previous work (1971 to 1984) has interpreted the provenance to be the Klamath’s, whereas a more recent study (1990) found that the formation is consistent with derivation from the Idaho Batholith.  This later was based on the lack of young volcanics and/or intrusive rocks of this age in the Klamath’s.  The objective of the study will be to determine if the Idaho Batholith was a significant source of detritus in the formation.

The study will focus on a significant proportion of the clasts that cannot be identified in the field.  If these are determined to be volcanic, it would have significant implications for the timing of volcanic arc development and would verify sediment sources to the east.  If they are determined to be metavolcanic or metasedimentary, the source is more consistent with a Klamath source.  The clasts may also be found to be mixed from both sources, and that the provenance may have also varied through time.  These ideas will be tested by the proposed work.

 

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Daniel McCuan, California State University, Bakersfield; Developing the Methods and Techniques for Radiometric Dating using Laser-Ablation Inductively-Coupled-Plasma Mass-Spectrometry (LA-ICP/MS); Advisor Dr. Staci Lowy.

The purpose of Mr. McCuan’s work will be to establish the methods and techniques to use the LA-ICP/MS to assign absolute U/Pb ages of formation of the mineral zircon.  Due to the limitations of different LA-ICP/MS machines different techniques must be developed for each facility.  Using known standards, he will apply and alter previously developed methods to reproduce isotopic compositions of well-calibrated standard materials.  The work will hopefully eliminate the need to outsource radiometric determinations, thus reducing costs and expediting research at the institution.

 

 

 

The 2008 - 2009

NCGS Richard Chambers Memorial

Scholarship Awards

Masters Degree - $1,000

 

 
 The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce the award of two 2008-2009 NCGS Master Degree Scholarships of $1,000 each, and one PhD Degree Scholarship of $2,000.  The awardees are Christopher Bowles; (University of California, Davis), Joshua T. Goodman (San Francisco State University), and Richard O. Lease (University of California, Santa Barbara).  More details on these research topics will be included in the future.
 
 
$1,000 Master Degree Scholarships
 
 
Christopher Bowles; University of California, Davis; Identifying old marine terraces through topographic and geologic analysis near Fort Ross, California; Advisor Dr. Eric Cowgill.
 

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Joshua T. Goodman; San Francisco State University; Mapping a sequence of deformed Plio-Pleistocene lacustrine and alluvial sediments in the Confidence Hills, Death Valley National Park, California; Advisor: Dr. S. John Caskey.

 

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$2,000 PhD Degree Scholarship

 

Richard O. Lease, University of California, Santa Barbara; Topographic evolution of the sourthern Sierra Nevada: How much relief was generated since the late Miocene?; Advisor: Dr. Bodo Bookhagen.

 

 

 

 

 

2007 - 2008

 

 

The 2007 - 2008

NCGS Undergraduate Scholarship Award

$500

 

The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce the award of the 2007 – 2008 Undergraduate Scholarship to Ms. Kathryn Quigley of U.C. of California, Berkeley.  Ms. Quigley’s senior thesis focuses on the large, slow-moving landslides of the Berkeley Hills.  She will be working with Dr. Roland Bergmann and will focus on the seasonal dependence of creeping landslides in the Berkeley Hills.  She will be utilizing Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) remote sensing data from two satellites.  The InSAR analysis will allow velocity determinations of the landslides which will be mapped in a GIS program.  The NCGS funding will also allow her to include a larger field component in her research, including mapping the surface expression of the slides with GPS, a Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) survey, and borehole inclinometer readings from existing geotechnical boreholes.  Dr. Gerald Bawden of the USGS in Sacramento will provide access to a GPS mapping system that will allow tracking of slides through time (4D).  She believes the data generated will contribute to the on-going analysis of these landslides.  Join us in congratulating her on her award!

 

 

 

 

The 2007 - 2008

NCGS Richard Chambers Memorial

Scholarship Awards

Masters Degree - $1,000

The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce TWO $1,000 Masters Degree Richard Chambers Memorial Awards.  The scholarships were awarded in late February, and are named for former member Richard Chambers who provided a bequest to the NCGS several years ago.

Mr. Kean Bliss is working on his Masters at San Diego State University, and expects to complete the degree in May 2009.  His project is the Evaluation of XRD and Raman peak broadening in shock metamorphosed calcite and dolomite from selected carbonate target bolide impact structures.  His advisor is Dr. Jared Morrow.  The purpose of the study is to determine if peak broadening observed on an XRD analysis curve, interpreted to be a manifestation of shock metamorphism, is unique to carbonate target rocks and if the pattern can be produced by a micro-Raman spectrometer.  The impact structure sample analyses will be compared to carbonate samples from other natural, high pressure-temperature geological settings (faults, marbles, carbonatites, etc.) to provide a test that the peak broadening documented in known shocked carbonates from impact craters is a unique feature. 

Ms. Abigail Stephens is working on her Masters at Oregon State University, under Dr. John Dilles.  Dr. Dilles anticipates completion of the thesis by middle or late 2008.  The thesis is entitled The Lights Creek Stock copper deposits: porphyry copper or evaporitic-source copper iron-oxide mineralization.  The Lights Creek copper-bearing granitoid intrusion is located in the Plumas copper belt in the northern California Sierra Nevada, south of the Cascade Range, and just west of the Basin and Range physiographic region.  Previously identified as a porphyry copper system on the basis of stockwork veinlets and veins in a granitic host, the mineral alteration assemblages and zonation in the stock differ significantly from classic porphyry systems and exhibit some characteristics of iron oxide-copper-gold systems.  Field research will help decipher the current ambiguities.

Both applications were selected from a field of highly competitive and well designed submittals.  Both thesis document creative approaches to several interesting geologic problems and will provide new data relevant to California geology and geology in general.

 

 

 

 

The 2007 - 2008

NCGS Richard Chambers Memorial

Scholarship Awards

Ph.D. Degree - $2,000

The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce one $2,000 Ph.D. Degree Richard Chambers Memorial Award. The scholarship was awarded in late February, and is named for former member Richard Chambers who provided a bequest to the NCGS several years ago.  The application was selected from a field of highly competitive and well designed applications.

Ms. Beth Ann Wisely is working on her Ph.D. at the University of Oregon with Dr. Katharine Cashman.  Her project, Monitoring aquifer deformation in the Klamath Basin, Northern California: Remote characterization using InSAR and well level data, seeks to contribute to surface water and groundwater resource management in the Klamath basin of northern California and southern Oregon, a political hotbed issue for over a decade.  As the result of recent droughts, increasing groundwater use in agricultural irrigation, and environmental legislation that has shifted the allocation of extracted groundwater towards replenishment and improvement of habitat for native fish species, a fierce struggle over water rights has developed between the local agricultural community and a unique alliance of Native Americans, fishing communities, and environmental interests.  In October 2007, in accordance with legislative compromise, two miles of earthen dikes that had kept the Williamson River Delta drained for cultivation were destroyed.  The farmland will be reclaimed as marshland habitat.  As these types of changes occur, the need for a clear understanding of the hydrologic system becomes imperative.

She will be using an analysis technique developed at the University of Oregon principally for alluvial aquifer basins in a well-established plate boundary fault zones.  The study will provide an opportunity to investigate the consistency of the method for use in aquifers comprised primarily of volcanic material, and located in a more dispersed and less studied tectonic province.  If the relatively inexpensive analysis technique provides a consistent monitoring technique, or can be adapted to this setting, it could then be generally applied to other Pacific Northwest rural communities that rely heavily on groundwater resources, but that may not have the widely publicized environmental concerns of, or focus on, as the Klamath basin.

 

 

 

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PREVIOUS YEARS

2006 - 2007

 

 

 

The 2006 - 2007

NCGS Undergraduate Scholarship Award

$500

 

The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce the award of the 2007 Undergraduate Scholarship for $500 to Ms. Sharon Bywater.  She is a student in the Geology Department at Southern Oregon University.  Her advisor is Dr. Bill Elliot.  Her thesis was entitled Petrographic Analysis of Sandstone Concretions in the Hornbrook Formation (Upper Cretaceous), Siskiyou County, California.  The following is from her final abstract.

 

The Hornbrook Formation (Upper Cretaceous) is exposed along the northeastern margin of the Klamath Mountains from southwestern Oregon to north-central California. The sediments of the Hornbrook Formation are interpreted to have been deposited in a forearc basin similar to the Upper Cretaceous sediments of the Great Valley forearc in central California.  Typically, volcanic rock fragments and feldspars are common in forearc basin settings and are derived from denudation of the adjacent magmatic arc.  Previous petrographic studies of Hornbrook sandstones, however, reported an absence of volcanic rock fragments and 15 to 30 percent feldspars.  The absence of volcanic rock fragments in sandstones of the Hornbrook Formation may be the result of (1) compaction and/or obliteration of volcanic rock fragments during diagenesis, e.g. formation of pseudomatrix, (2) alteration of volcanic detritus to clay minerals by circulating diagenetic fluids, and / or (3) absence of volcanic detritus during deposition.  Within the Hornbrook Formation, there are numerous sandstone concretions ranging in size from 2 to 3 cm to over 2 meters in diameter cemented by poikilotopic calcite interpreted to have formed by early cessation in a shallow diagenetic environment.  These poikilotopic calcite cements may preserve ductile rock fragments and / or feldspars that otherwise would be obliterated by compaction and / or altered by diagenetic fluids.

 

Twelve samples of sandstone concretions were collected from each member of the Hornbrook Formation and thin sections were prepared.  Detailed petrographic examinations and point count analyses following the Gazzi-Dickinson method reveals a higher abundance of feldspars in the concretions compared with previous petrographic studies.  In addition, QtFL and QmFLt modal plots of petrographic data from the concretions are consistent with compositions of Late Cretaceous sandstones of the Great Valley Sequence.  These compositions are interpreted to represent the final stages of unroofing associated with denudation of the Sierra Nevadan magmatic arc.  In summary, this study highlights the usefulness of sandstone concretions formed by early cementation in petrographic studies and provides valuable insights into the Late Cretaceous tectonic setting o the Hornbrook Formation.

 

 

 

 

The 2006 - 2007

NCGS Richard Chambers Memorial

Scholarship Awards

Masters Degree - $750

 The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce TWO $750 Masters Degree Richard Chambers Memorial Awards.  The scholarships are named for former member Richard Chambers who provided a bequest to the NCGS recently.

Ms. Kamala Brown is working on her MS degree at California State University, Sacramento.  She is in the process of studying the Physical and Hydrological Characterization of the Clark Meadow, California.  Her advisor is Dr. Kevin Corwell.  She will investigate the physical characteristics and hydrologic function of Clark Meadow, located in the Feather River Watershed of the Northern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California. This watershed has been significantly degraded over the past century due to grazing, mining, and logging operations.  A major impact of the degradation has been incision of the streams that run through the high elevation meadows, including Clark Meadow.  Restoration is being done throughout the watershed.  One significant restoration work was performed in Clark Meadow that diverted the stream from its incised channel into a shallow remnant channel that is currently stable.  No restoration work was done in the downstream section of the meadow where the stream incision is up to 3 to 4 meters.  This allows a unique opportunity to study both sections with the same meadow.  Since California receives water from Sierra snow pack, the study will address questions that have broader implications on water management throughout the state.  Specifically does a stable wet meadow store more water and release it more slowly during the dry months than a dry meadow with an incised stream?  If so, what physical characteristics contribute to this increased water storage?

Mr. Steven Springhorn is working on his MS degree at California State University, Sacramento, under Dr. Brian Hausback.  His thesis, expected to be competed in Fall 2007, is entitled Sequence stratigraphic analysis and hydrological characterization of Cenozoic strata in the Sacramento valley near the Sutter Buttes.  The Sutter Buttes is a rich agricultural area dominated by water-intensive farming as well as home to a rapidly growing population that is projected to increase fifty percent by 2020.  Groundwater currently provides one-third of the total water supply in the region and demand will significantly increase in the future.  This requires a better understanding and characterization of regional aquifer systems.  The goal of the thesis and a graduate student assistantship with the California Department of Water Resources (DWR) is to investigate the subsurface geology and hydrogeology of the Sacramento basin near Sutter Buttes with sequence stratigraphic methods.  Such a framework will allow an improved understanding of the relationship between Sutter Buttes volcanic sediments and Sacramento Valley sediments, and the three-dimensional distribution of regional hydrostratigraphic units in the Basin.

Both applications were selected from a field of highly competitive and well designed submittals.  Both thesis document creative approaches to several interesting geologic problems and will provide new data relevant to California geology and geology in general.

 

 

 

 

The 2006 – 2007

NCGS Richard Chambers Memorial

Scholarship Awards

Ph.D. Degree - $1,000

The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce TWO $1,000 Ph.D. Degree Awards. The scholarship is named for former member Richard Chambers who provided a bequest to the NCGS recently.  The application was selected from a field of highly competitive and well designed applications.

Ms. Jeanette Hagan is working on her Ph.D. at the University of California, Santa Barbara with Dr. Cathy Busby.  Her PhD thesis is currently entitled Evolution of the Central Sierra Frontal Fault Zone: Clues from Volcanic Stratigraphy.  Ms. Hagan has spent the previous two field seasons mapping just south of Lake Tahoe, and has mapped the Carson Pass and Sonora Pass areas, and intends on mapping Ebbetts Pass area.  The research integrates volcanology, sedimentology, stratigraphy, structural geology, and geochronology in order to understand tectonic problems.  She notes that extensive recent studies have applied modern laboratory and geophysical techniques to the Sierra, while some of the best constraints on understanding Sierran landscape evolution have come from field studies of datable Cenozoic strata in the Sierras.  Mapping during the past two field seasons have focused on the volcanic-volcaniclastic rocks and their contacts with the underlaying Mesozoic granites and metamorphic rocks at both passes, and addressed questions related to Sierran landscape evolution, ancestral Cascades arc magmatism and tectonics, and Basin and Range Faulting.  This year her research will address the timing of range-front faulting in the central Sierra Nevada.

 

Ms. Elizabeth Cassel is working on her Ph.D. at Stanford University with Dr. Stephan Graham.  Her PhD thesis is entitled Cenozoic Tectonic and Landscape Evolution of the Northern Sierra Nevada: Evaluating the development of the range through changes in fluvial system sedimentology, topography, and geomorphology.  She will be targeting Eocene-Miocene strata in the northern Sierra to better understand the development of the mountain range in that region.  She hopes to answer important larger questions:  What geomorphic or topographic changes controlled aggradation / erosion cycles in the Eocene – Miocene fluvial system?  How has the topography and relief of the range evolved through the Cenozoic?  What were the driving tectonic forces behind the topographic changes?  Her investigation will be a multi-disciplinary study using detailed sedimentological analysis of Eocene fluvial strata, high-resolution dating and correlation of the Oligocene – Miocene volcanic sequence, light stable isotope paleoaltimetry from volcanic glass separates to reconstruct mean surface elevations, and paleo-landscape reconstructions derived from GPS – GIS mapping of the geometry of contact relations between Cenozoic valley-filling units and valley walls, current topography of units, and the depth and extent of erosional surfaces combined with a model of the paleo-geomorphology developed from the first three methods.

 

 

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2005 - 2006

 

The 2005 - 2006

NCGS Undergraduate Scholarship Award

$500

 

The NCGS is pleased to provide details to the earlier announcement of the award of the 2006 Undergraduate Scholarship for $500 to Ms. Holly Olson.  She was a student in the Department of Geosciences at San Francisco State University.  Her thesis topic is/was "Temporal and Spatial Variations of Coastal Marine Terrace Deposits along the Coast of the Point Reyes Peninsula".  Her advisor was Dr. Karen Grove.  The area of her study is characterized tectonically by a syncline whose northwest trending axis is located on the western side of Drakes Estero.  Previous work had shown that the area is being uplifted due to folding and thrust faulting, and the uplift is recorded by coastal marine terraces formed at sea level and now found at varying elevations along the peninsula.  Lateral differences in the Miocene deposits were proposed to be studied in part by the construction of detailed measured stratigraphic columns between Limantour Beach and Bolinas.  By correlating the sequences to climate data from other studies, it was hoped to explain increased sediment supply in terms of observed climate changes.  Additionally, the columns were to be incorporated into a northwest–southeast trending cross section, and integrated into previous work in order to help reconstruct the tectonic and paleogeographic history of the area.

 

 

 

The 2005 - 2006

NCGS Graduate Scholarship Award

Masters Degree - $750 

 

The NCGS is pleased to provide details to the earlier announcement of the award of the 2006 Graduate Scholarship (Masters Degree) of $750 to Ms. Emily Fudge.  She is a student in the Department of Geology at Humboldt State University in Arcata, California.  Her thesis topic is/was "Tectonic History and Bulk Geochemistry Analysis of the Grey Rocks Outlier, Klamath Mountains, California".  Her advisor was Dr. Susan M. Cashman.  The following synopsis has been greatly simplified from Emily’s submittal:  The Grey Rocks outlier consists of Devonian greenstone overlying Ordovician ultramafic rocks of the Trinity terrane within the Eastern Klamath Belt (EKB).  The Klamath Mountains province consists of a complex series of accreted terranes that extend from Mount Shasta to the current coastline, and are juxtaposed along north-south striking reverse faults.  The EKB is the eastern-most accreted terrane in the province.  An ambiguity in the nature of the contact between Grey Rocks and the EKB, (correlation to multiple greenstone outcrops  in three different terranes within the EKB, interpretation of the contact as either a depositional unconformity, or as a low-angle normal fault), as well as evidence for late Mesozoic or Tertiary extensional faulting in the Klamath Mountains lead to the map project.  Field mapping in 2005 identified the basal contact as a fault and the Grey Rocks allochthon exhibited sheared rock sections up to 20 feet thick.  The mapping supported previous work that found other allochthons to have faulted basal contacts; extensional faults were proposed to extend across the region as a result of gravitational collapse.  This funding would help pay for lab investigations including petrologic, XRF, and XRD analyses of the Grey Rocks assemblage to help correlate the rocks to other greenstones in the three terranes within the EKB.  The data will be incorporated into a digital database of the Klamath Mountains being complied by the Shasta-Trinity National Forest.

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2004 - 2005

 

The 2004 - 2005

NCGS Undergraduate Scholarship Award

 $500

 

The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce that Ms. Sunshine Mansfield at Humboldt State University has been awarded the Society's $500.00 Undergraduate College Scholarship for the Year 2004 - 2005.  Ms. Mansfield's proposal "Structural and Petrologic investigation of the Cooksie Shear Zone, Mendocino Triple Junction, California" describes an analysis of an important and interesting problem relevant to Northern California geology.  Her proposal was selected from a field of well designed and highly competitive applications.  We look forward to a presentation of her research findings at a future meeting of the NCGS in the year 2005.

 

 

 

 

The 2004 - 2005

NCGS Graduate College Scholarship Award

$1,000

 

The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce that Ms. Christen Rowe at the University of California at Santa Cruz has been awarded the Society's annual $1,000 Graduate College Scholarship for the year 2004-2005.  Ms. Rowe’s proposal Fluid-Assisted Metamorphism Along a Dismembered Fragment of the Coast Range Thrust, Ring Mountain, Marin County, California describes a creative analysis of new data relevant to northern California geology.  Her proposal was selected from a field of well designed and highly competitive applications.  We look forward to a presentation of her research findings at a future meeting of the NCGS in the year 2005.

 

 

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2003 - 2004

 

The 2003 - 2004

NCGS Graduate Scholarship Award

$1,000

The Northern California Geological Society is pleased to announce an award of $1000 to Mr. Chad Pritchard of Humboldt State University in Arcata, California, for his Master of Science thesis project on Deciphering Recent Coseismic Subsidence Events of Northern Humboldt Bay, California.  Mr. Pritchard’s research program is aimed at refining chronology and stratigraphic patterns of salt marsh subsidence and regional synclinal and anticlinal uplift episodes, in response to Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquakes.  The proposal was selected from a field of nine well-designed and highly competitive applications, on topics including paleoclimate pattern interpretation, extensional crustal deformation, timing of regional fault slip episodes, acid mine drainage contamination, fluvial geomorphology and river habitat zonation, processes and patterns of cavern weathering, and landslide hazard mapping.  We congratulate Mr. Pritchard on his award, and look forward to a presentation of his research at a future meeting of the Society in the year 2004.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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